Thursday, December 20, 2012

Restricting Our Rights is Not the Answer - Pt. 1

It’s been a week since my last column was published. In that respect, I have been a bit lazy. Since my last column, an unspeakable, heartbreaking event occurred, and this is going to be my first column commenting on the event, and my second will be published tomorrow.

My iPhone alerted me of what had happened a little after 10:30 in the morning last Friday. At that time, I and America was unaware of the magnitude of the shooting, and the effects it would have on our country in the days following.

I had absolutely zero words to say after I found out that little children had been murdered. The only emotion that would come out of me, were tears. Tears for the kids, teachers, staff, and tears for America, because I knew the discussion that would quickly follow.

Gun Control. Just hours after the news had been broken, liberal pundits were already speaking out that guns had caused this tragedy, and that we should have stricter gun control.

These columns, comments, and opinions seriously angered me.

In America, do we not have enough decency to not make everything into a political battle? Can some things not have any political spin to them?

These were the questions I was asking myself, my friends, and all of my twitter followers.

I was absolutely appalled and disgusted that such a horrible and tragic event could be turned into political shenanigans in a matter of hours. Did these people not have respect, knowledge, and decency for what had just happened?

It was a reality that no American, young or old, wanted to face. Many, many innocent people including small children had just been murdered in what should be the safest place for them. On top of that, not one person murdered had warranted any reason for their death, yet in a matter of seconds their lives would be so selfishly taken from them.

However, it is a reality that we must face, whether we like it or not.

In our society of “normalcy”, there are abnormal people. Abnormal people do things that you and I cannot comprehend because we process events on a rational level.

The man pulling the trigger was not normal. There was something wrong with him, but there were no real outward signs that anything was wrong, and preventing this massacre was almost impossible. There is only one rational way I could see this massacre being prevented, but we’ll discuss that in tomorrow’s column.

Saturday afternoon, the Connecticut Chief Medical Examiner discussed what he had seen at the scene, and with those of the dead. He told America that each of the children that he had completed an autopsy on had been shot anywhere from 3 to 11 times.

This man, Adam Lanza, wanted these children, teachers, and staff members dead.

For what reason? We will probably never know, and quite frankly, I don’t care to know why. All I know is, there must be some drastic action to take place, so that something like this never happens again, and that’s what we’ll discuss in the column tomorrow.

However, I hate talking about this. It is sad. It makes me cry, and I wish the media would leave the town of Newtown, Connecticut alone.

Also, I do not think it is appropriate for anyone to be speaking of this tragedy in political terms, that’s why tomorrow I will be offering a future solution to this problem, and I will continue to condemn those on both the right and the left that turned this unspeakable act into a political hotbed.

I pray every night for the children, staff, teachers, and all of the innocent lives that were lost because of a single man’s actions. This event has affected me, not like any other, because I am still in school, and I still remember what it was like as a first grader.

I hope we can find it in ourselves to stop the political spinning of this tragedy, and just leave the town alone so they can mourn their losses.

America is mourning with them.

God Bless You & God Bless America.

1 comment:

Otavio Lima said...

"but there were no real outward signs that anything was wrong, and preventing this massacre was almost impossible." I disagree with your analysis at these two points. Having worked with mentally ill patients for 20 years as a Chaplain, I can tell you that one glance at this man instantly revealed an abnormal individual. His mother knew this. She found his behavior abnormal, and consulted with others. The problem was a lack of rational and effective decision making, which would have forcibly hospitalized him as a danger to self and to others. But here too is a lib denial of evil. As a southerner, I am sure you know "A Good Man is Hard to Find", Flannery O'Connor's short story which masterfully skewers this fantasy. I agree with you that controlling guns is simply an avoidance of responsibility, projecting the real problem on others.